Category Archives: Feminism

#CMCmath Restorative Justice and Circle Talk Resources

I spoke at CMC South today and while I am super happy with how if went there will definitely be a reflective piece about my first time speaking (outside of the safety of TMC) and all the things I need to do differently next time.

But for now I just want to put up all the resources I used.

Circles

This is the post on circles I wrote a while back.

Looking at it now I want to do a whole post on circle questions.

Restorative Justice

I condensed what is 3 days worth of training into to 45 minutes so instead of trying to type all that out I’m just going to link you to all my resources.

I said this was WashPo but it’s NY Times Magazine.  This article is a primer in RJ.

What is RJ?

Implementing RJ in Schools

Edutopia’s Collection of Links on RJ

 

I will post more about the talk and circles later.

 

Night!

 

 

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Chalkline with Ilana Horn. (Part 1)

 

Okay, Lani and I talk too much and Lani is always on point soo this is part 1 of my interview with Lani.  In two weeks (maybe next week?) I will put up the second part. In this part we talk about her journey to PhD work, what she’s teaching, how much she loves teachers, and her observational tips.

Episode 5

This week’s syllabus:

To read:  I’m reading Lindy West’s Shrill: Notes from a Loud Woman.  As a loud women myself I love hearing that I am not alone.  On a side note I tweeted to her about something and I apparently set off the trolls and dudes, from 2 tweets interacting with her I was called a cunt by at minimum 45 strangers on the internet in the course of 10 minutes. If you want a peek into her experience here is her interview on this American Life.

To read (2): Instead of listening this week I will share the statement from the unconscious woman that was assaulted at Stanford.  Read it.

To watch: So I’m watching Being Mary Jane with Gabrielle Union.  If you want some slightly trashy and hugely engaging summer binging the first two seasons are on Netflix.

 

 

Chalkline with Sadie Estrella.

TFTCL (1)

Dudes, do you know anything about Hawaii? Well you will after this!  Sadie is here this week to tell you all about the school systems in Hawaii, the importance of relationships, and the necessity of following your gut. Her feelings of belonging and her sense of self are so envy-making.

Episode 3.

This Week’s Syllabus:

To Read:  Lots to read this week.

1) Check out the #MTBoS30 hashtag for a bunch of great posts from math teachers.  I’m going to do a weekly round up in my next post here.

2) Grace’s post here.  On why love is not enough.  And from that this piece by Jeff Duncan-Andrade on Critical Hope.

3) Lastly, in the podcast I reference this NYTs piece on poverty and school performance which is so important.

To Listen and Watch: I don’t have a ton at this moment.  Is there something I should be listening to or watching?  Let me know here or on the twitters.

Person Sadie thinks you should follow on twitter: Brendan 

 

Chalkline with Rafranz Davis.

OMG you guys.  Talking to Rafranz is like talking to the friend you’ve been missing for years who is so impressive it makes you babble.

Episode 2

We hit on growing up and reading her first book by a black author, segregation, #educolor, body image,  teaching her children, and surviving the zombie apocalypse.

This Week’s Syllabus:

To Read:  Can I say everything Melinda writes?  But particularly this piece for the Atlantic on why white kids need diverse teachers.  (Also, I mistakenly call her Melissa in the podcast cause I am the worst.  It’s Melinda. I’m Sorry.)

To Listen:  Is there any other option?  Lemonade.

To Watch:  (Well, also, Lemonade but)   Fermat’s Room.  I am showing this movie to my third period seniors and I love that it is not only a great and addictive thriller but it’s about people doing math, in Spanish.  This vine about Sexual Assault Prevention Month.  NSFW

Person Rafranz thinks everyone should follow on twitter: Zac Chase

 

 

 

Shut Up and Duck Face

About two years ago the Media went through this hateful phase with selfies.  They were all about teenage girls being the worst ever for taking pictures of themselves. Let’s be clear here, patriarchy makes it real easy to dismiss and mock things that teenage girls like first.  Things that often become cultural phenomenon. See Snapchat. And for that matter selfie.

So, for the last two years I have tried to take a picture of my face everyday for the month of February.  In order to stand with the teenage girls who want to own their own image.  To remember that I like my face and that it’s a good one. And because my friends and this community are spread across the world and I miss your faces.

Want to play along?  Use the hashtag #shutupandduckface on instagram or twitter.  See some previous years pics here.  Hope you’ll join us.

Weeeeeee Starts tomorrow!!!Photo on 1-31-16 at 2.39 PM #2.jpg

I have not the words.

It’s Sunday April 13th. Tomorrow I will be giving a speech to my whole school.  A school full of girls. Two hundred and two girls sleep in their dorms about 1000 meters from my house. Tomorrow they will write essays.  Tomorrow they will prepare for spanish tests and physics tests.  They will brave the general difficulty that comes with being a teenager.

Their parents are at home in California, Massachusetts, Hong Kong, and Nigeria.  They are asleep.  They have chosen that their daughters be educated at this place. That their daughters be given the opportunities granted only by living in these gray walls.

My girls have brothers and sisters who they talk to as often as possible.  They have boyfriends and girlfriends and all types of friends. They are very very lucky. I am thinking about all of this as I write my speech.

Then in the middle of the night armed men enter the building and light it on fire. It is a well known fact that our school is built like an oven, stone on the outside wood on the inside.  The girls, being smart and well trained, evacuate.  There they are kidnapped. In whatever they are wearing, with whatever they have, they are removed from our care. They are taken in the night by these men with guns.

Before the government responds they are taken across international borders.  They do not call their parents or talk to their friends.  They are gone.

They have been missing now for two weeks. About twenty managed to escape but the rest seem to have vanished. Their parents are on TV begging for their daughters to be returned as news ticker divulges the details the last celebrity engagement.

There are stories about them being sold and married off and killed but they don’t eclipse the truly important opening of the new superhero movie.  Because this is America and we know what’s important.

It has been eighteen days and we have not gotten them back.

The thing is it would never happen here because my girls are wealthy, my girls live in America, and most of my girls are white. The problem with that is the girls taken in Nigeria are mine, too. They are all of ours.  So why aren’t we acting like it?